Home Tips and Guides

Best Online Piano Lessons 2021: Learning Apps, Courses, Software

If you’ve arrived here, it’s most likely because you want to learn to play the piano but don’t know where to begin.
You may have heard of online piano methods but are unsure if they will work for you, or you may simply be unsure which one to use.
You’ve arrived to the right location. Let’s begin by determining where online piano lessons fit into the larger world of piano instruction, and then we’ll look at eight of my favourite online piano approaches.

WHAT PLACE DO ONLINE METHODS HAVE IN THE MUSICAL PROCESS?

Piano Methods on the Internet

Traditional lessons with an in-person teacher are often the first thing that springs to mind when people think of learning an instrument. There’s a reason for this: for serious classical pianists, in-person tuition are still the ideal technique.

But what about the rest of the world? What about individuals who don’t want to perform at Carnegie Hall or win competitions, but simply want to enjoy themselves by playing songs they like?

What about those who want to join bands or learn any genre of music at their own pace? What about individuals who don’t have tens of thousands of dollars to spend on piano lessons?

Student of Piano

For the most part, an online piano approach will suffice. However, there are a number of disadvantages to using online methods that are impossible to avoid. Most approaches, for example, are one-size-fits-all, and you may not be able to get personalised guidance on areas that are bothering you.

Another area where teaching in posture and hand position is lacking is in the classroom. While most techniques provide a lesson on this, I’ve found that if you don’t have someone to poke you in the back and remind you to pay attention to your hand posture, it’s easy to get into bad habits.

Musicality, tone, dynamics, and articulation are all areas where in-person instruction is beneficial. It’s also difficult to keep yourself motivated to practise when there’s no one to answer to.

But don’t give up! If you’re concerned about this, seek for features like teacher contact, video demonstrations, and goal-setting practise in any online approach you choose.

If you know what you’re searching for, you can easily complement these subjects using YouTube courses.

WHERE DO FREE METHODS FIT IN?

Another option you may have explored is learning to play the piano using free online tools. While there are some excellent free resources available, such as MusicTheory.net and Creative Piano Academy on YouTube, I prefer to use a commercial technique, and I’ll explain why.

To begin with, the vast majority of YouTube piano lessons merely teach you how to play a certain song for the sake of playing it, with no musical principle or lesson attached.

This means that while you’ll be able to play the tune and possibly improve your finger dexterity, you won’t be learning any real abilities that you can apply to other pieces or developing any true musical understanding.

Another advantage of paid methods is that they are intended to guide you through the course in a logical and planned manner. This makes it simple to figure out what to do and, as a result, to make good progress. Lessons on YouTube are more dispersed or scant.

Finally, functionality such as music libraries, accuracy feedback, and teacher support will be unavailable.

Free piano resources are useful for adding repertoire and tips to other techniques, as well as filling up any knowledge gaps. It’s important to be aware of their limitations, though.

ONLINE PIANO METHODS WE PREFER

Choosing the ideal approach for you from the various options available might be difficult.

To assist you with making your choices, I’ve compiled a list of eight excellent online piano methods, each with its unique set of strengths and disadvantages.

You must first determine your priorities when it comes to learning the piano before making your decision.

Do you aspire to perform Beethoven and Mozart? Being a member of a blues band? Maybe you want to learn everything there is to know about music, or maybe you just want to sit down and listen to some music.

Whatever your learning approach is, there’s a course for you here. Also, for extra information, be sure to read the in-depth (full) reviews of any methods that grab your attention!

Let’s have a look at the comparative table below before going into the evaluations to get a bird’s eye view of the apps that made the cut.

Cost Interactive Features Platform Emphasis Theory Lessons Music Library Video Lessons Teacher Support

Overview of Flowkey $9.99-$19.99 every month or $329.99 per life Yes, there are some yeses.

Popular Music Skoove $9.99-$19.99 each month some yes, some no, some yes, some yes

Improvisation/ chords for the piano in 21 days Prices range from $97 to $497. yes, yes, and some nay

FOUNDATIONS FOR ALL AGES – FLOWKEY

Review of Flowkey

Flowkey is a web-based system that offers beginner and intermediate students comprehensive piano lessons. The tutorials use movies with graphics to demonstrate ideas, and you may check your accuracy with your device’s mic or a midi connection.

While Flowkey provides instantaneous feedback on notes and rhythms played, unlike the other techniques on this list, it does not provide a score or measure your progress.

Flowkey Interface is a user-friendly interface that allows you to

This course is well-rounded in my opinion because it does not focus on just one type of music or style of playing, and it includes theory and technique.

Reading music, playing chords, improvisation, accompaniment, and scales are all covered in the sessions, allowing pupils to play a wide range of tunes.

The highlight of Flowkey is its extensive music collection, which includes over 1500 songs divided into four categories: beginner, intermediate, advanced, and professional. The professional songs reach a rather high degree of difficulty, which should take a few years to achieve.

Classical music, game music, joyful, groovy, and R&B are all areas of the collection that can be browsed by genre or mood. There is a good selection, but you can’t print the music to use outside of the app or view more than one line at a time.

Flowkey should appeal to both children and adults, however younger learners will almost certainly require adult assistance.

If you want to learn about a variety of musical styles, this is the course for you.

RIGHT NOW, TRY THE COMPLETE REVIEW

PLAYGROUND SESSIONS – A FAVORITE OF MUSIC FANS

Review of Playground Sessions

This piano approach from Quincy Jones sounds like a lot of fun, especially with a name like Playground Sessions. It’s no wonder, then, that its courses are video game-like, with your computer or tablet displaying real-time feedback on notes and rhythms. Only digital pianos and keyboards are compatible with this technology.

This is the course for you if you want to learn to play popular songs for fun. Playground Sessions has a few elements that make it a suitable fit if you’re not wanting to study piano seriously and want a fun hobby that will keep you interested.

Interface for Playground Sessions

The gamification element keeps you hooked on outdoing yourself and your friends by beating high scores, and playing songs you like and may have heard on the radio makes learning them simple and enjoyable. Most songs include a background track, which makes it feel like you’re performing with a band, which is always fun.

This strategy is also enjoyable for children because of these aspects. Playground Sessions suggests that students aged seven and up participate in their programme. However, some of the ideas may require parental assistance, or the app can be used in conjunction with piano lessons with an instructor.

Playground Sessions offers a big music catalogue (over 1000 songs) in a variety of genres, as well as interactive courses that may incorporate video. The classes are broken down into three levels, the first of which is ideal for those who have never played an instrument before.

You will not gain a complete understanding of theory, technique, musicianship, or ear training with Playground Sessions. It will not increase your piano skills, yet you will be able to read and play sheet music for the majority of popular music. This course is also a fantastic place to start if you want to move on to more advanced topics.

If you want to play music you already know while having a good time, this is the course for you.

RIGHT NOW, TRY THE COMPLETE REVIEW

PIANOFORALL – IMPROVISATION IS EVERYTHING

Review of Pianoforall

Pianoforall is an e-book course that teaches utilising a chord-based system, with the goal of enabling you to sound fantastic in a matter of days, even if you’ve never played an instrument before.

The nine ebooks included in this course are strongly focused on chords, playing by ear, jazz, composition, and improvisation. It covers chords, progressions, keys, and song structure, as well as the fundamentals of music.

Books by Pianoforall

If playing from sheet music is your primary objective, you should use a method like Piano Marvel or the classic piano path.

While there are no interactive aspects in the ebooks like there are in the other ways on our list, there are over 200 video courses and over 500 audio tracks and exercises. So it’s not the same as trying to learn from a textbook.

Because it takes a dive-right-in strategy that may feel like a lot of information to take at once, this is certainly a course intended at adults and teens.

Give Pianoforall a try if you’ve had limited success with sheet music-based approaches or if you can already read music but want to improvise or fill in your knowledge gaps on performing jazz and rock n’ roll.

If you want to learn chords and play by ear, or if you want to be able to play in a band or take requests, this is the course for you.

RIGHT NOW, TRY THE COMPLETE REVIEW

How to Use a MIDI Keyboard: VSTi Plugins, Recording, DAW Basics

We just published an article about our favourite MIDI keyboards and why they’re a viable alternative to keyboards and even full-fledged digital pianos.
Depending on your musical history, purchasing an instrument that produces no sound may seem heretical, however this is an antiquated viewpoint. In this day and age, nearly everything we do revolves on computers and software, and the music scene is no exception.
This is the first in a series of articles that will walk you through the fundamentals of computer music production. This guide is intended for pianists (and keyboardists) of all ability levels, and it will show you how to deal with software instruments properly (VSTi plugins).

Here’s a quick rundown of everything we’ll be talking about today:

What role do computers have in music production?

To get started, you’ll need the following items.

What is the best way to practise using software pianos?

How to make a piano recording

WHY DO PEOPLE USE COMPUTERS?

Let’s begin with a big assertion. It’s possible to create radio-ready piano sounds with a budget keyboard and a mid-tier laptop that equal those produced by full-fledged digital pianos.

It may sound outlandish, yet it isn’t so far-fetched.

Instead of mic’d up concert grands, many songs on the radio employ software piano libraries. The keyboardist has a lot of options thanks to software. It’s an antiquated perspective to avoid using software instruments because it makes performances “septic” or “lifeless.” You’ll miss out on a lot.

Studio for Music Production

If you’re still not convinced, consider this: software is an integral aspect of music production. You might be startled if your image of a music studio still includes enormous mixing consoles and outdated rack-mounted effects. A simple Macbook and a good pair of headphones are used to mix many tunes.

Embracing the digital side of music production isn’t easy, and it’s easy to get caught up in the intricacies. Many online lessons appear to assume that the audience aspires to be professional music producers. Learning as much as possible is admirable, but it much exceeds the needs of the ordinary population.

The goal of this series of guides isn’t to turn you into the next Quincy Jones or Max Martin. We’re just trying to give you a gentle introduction to virtual instruments. You’ll learn a few basic recording skills along the way, which will be all you need to share your music with the rest of the world.

If you’ve had trouble storing your music using your keyboard’s onboard recorder, we hope this advice will help.

If you’re already familiar with DAWs and the necessary setup, consider this a comprehensive recap of the fundamentals.

WHAT YOU REQUIRE

A DIGITAL PIANO OR A KEYBOARD

This is the focal point of our setup.

Keep in mind that your computer’s keyboard must be able to interact with it. A USB to Host port is recommended for simplicity.

Note that 5-pin MIDI Out connectors can also be utilised, but this requires a MIDI interface, which isn’t cheap and isn’t in popular demand. A MIDI interface is useful if you have a lot of legacy gear or synthesisers, but it’s not necessary for our needs.

We’re first and foremost pianists/keyboardists, thus we need a mechanism to convert our playing into data that the computer can interpret. While we can technically sequence piano parts, we want to keep the dynamics and natural tempo of our playing.

Sequencing: This phrase refers to the procedure of manually drawing notes in software. This is fantastic for making synth part loops, but nothing surpasses a talented pianist’s natural playing dynamics.

Any keyboard will suffice. Working with a keyboard with full-sized keys and velocity sensitivity is highly recommended. Make sure you have a sustain pedal on hand if you need one.

SE49 Nektar

In my instance, I’m using the Nektar SE-49, a synth action MIDI keyboard with 49 keys. It lacks fancy features such as pads, transport controls, or weighted keys, but it does offer full-sized keys and excellent pressure sensitivity.

The SE-49’s only significant flaw is that it lacks sound generating capabilities (it is, after all, a MIDI keyboard). This makes it a relatively portable choice, and we can quickly resolve the problem using software instruments.

APPLICATION SOFTWARE

This will be the source of our sound.

Addictive Keys, a popular budget-friendly choice, was suggested in our post on the best sub-$150 keyboards. It also comes with a standalone version, allowing us to skip around the convoluted matter of VST hosts and DAWs. A 10-day trial is available if you don’t want to pay for Addictive Keys. Give it a try to see whether it’s right for you.

Keys That Are Addictive

We also offer the free sforzando sample player and the Ivy Piano in 162 sample bundle for the more frugal folks. This is a fantastic piano library that rivals the pricey industry standard packs, and did I mention it’s completely free?

In any case, these are two excellent starter options that are well worth investigating. We’ll be using Addictive Keys in this lesson because it has a more user-friendly interface and customization possibilities.

In 162, piano

Check out Samantha’s article on some of the industry’s favourite piano sounds if you’re interested in learning more about other prominent piano libraries.

Plugins vs. Standalone: Samantha’s suggestions do not always come with a standalone version. Plugins are typically utilised in host software like production-oriented DAWs or performance-oriented programmes like Mainstage. Both Addictive Keys and sforzando support both formats, but you’ll learn how to use plugins in the second half of this tutorial.

THE USE OF A COMPUTER

It will work with any laptop or desktop computer running 64-bit Windows 7 or above or MacOS. We won’t be working with any programmes that require a lot of processing power, therefore a high-performance system isn’t required.

Make every effort to keep your computer from slowing down. As a general rule, a 2-core CPU with at least 4 GB of RAM is the absolute minimum, although more is always better.

Virtual Instruments for Laptops

Although you could theoretically use an iPad, we’ll eventually cover DAWs, which perform best on non-mobile operating systems.

I’ll be using a 2019 Lenovo Ideapad 320 running Windows 10 as a reference.

Linux: Unfortunately, as a music production operating system, Linux isn’t as widely supported. If you’re a Linux user, you may try following along, although certain things might not work without some tinkering.

Writing a guide to Linux Music Production will take a thesis because there are so many different distros and setups that we can’t test them all.

SPEAKERS/HEADPHONES

Guests of Honor

If we’re listening through laptop speakers, having nice sound doesn’t mean much. It is always preferable to have a good sound system or a beautiful pair of headphones.

While most digital pianos and keyboards come with built-in speakers, you may have to get creative with your connections to get your computer audio to play through them.

What if I want to use the speakers on my keyboard/digital piano?

What about recording the sound of the digital piano (Audio Out)?

This isn’t something we’ll talk about in this series because we’ll be focusing on software instruments. Most digital pianos do not allow audio to be routed through USB, making recording them difficult.

To collect the onboard samples, you’ll most likely require an audio interface and to deal with the audio outs. Check out our step-by-step guide on recording the sound of your digital piano.

INTERCONNECTION

Finally, we’ll need a mechanism to link our laptop to our keyboard.

In general, I prefer to use the USB to Host port. Because most keyboards have a USB Type B connector, any printer cable you have will work.

MIDI cord USB type A to B

There have been some whispers that USB MIDI is slow and prone to delay, however these claims are false. If professional gamers can operate with USB microphones and keyboards, so can we musicians.

Check out our in-depth MIDI Connection Guide if you’re having trouble connecting your keyboard to your device (laptop, tablet, or smartphone).

PRACTICE WITH SOFTWARE PIANOS

Let’s speak about how to use the software now. We’ll go over how to set up both Addictive Keys and sforzando in detail, as well as some of the more interesting features.

Because many firms sell their keyboards as plug and play, some drivers should be automatically installed as you connect your keyboard to your laptop. If they aren’t, go to the manufacturer’s website and get the necessary files.

If you’re using a software piano that doesn’t have a standalone option, I’d recommend moving ahead and installing a DAW before proceeding.

While non-DAW plugin hosts are available for free, I find them clumsy, and most recent DAWs have a lot more improvements that make them superior. Install the VST-format of your plugin after you’ve set up a DAW.

Drivers: Having the most up-to-date drivers is usually preferred when it comes to software, as you get bug fixes and increased stability. Even if your keyboard works right out of the box, it’s always a good idea to check the manufacturer’s website for the most recent driver and firmware updates.

KEYS THAT ARE ADDICTIVE

We’ll start with Addictive Keys, namely the Studio Grand edition, which I consider to be the best of the lot in terms of audio quality.

You’re not alone in asking where the Addictive Keys installer is. XLN Audio, like many other music software businesses, has chosen the software manager distribution approach, which is simple once set up but requires some effort at first.

I’m also irritated by the requirement of installing an installer in order to use a product I purchased, but it is what it is.

Whether you’re using the Trial or the Full version, XLN’s

Best Guitar VST Plugins: The Ultimate Guide 2021

Making authentic VSTi of guitars is incredibly impossible. I’ve been fairly vocal about this in the past, and my opinion remains the same.

You can find effective virtual emulations of many guitars that may be used for a variety of creative purposes, but it’s a different storey finding anything that makes you sit back and go “wow” (however, has any software ever made you do that?)

I’m not sure why trumpets, flutes, and other ridiculously obscure instruments that no one in their right mind has ever heard of make for incredibly convincing VSTs, but guitars – one of the most popular instruments in modern music — are so far behind.

I believe it has to do with guitars’ distinct playing technique — the way they are plucked, strummed, or fingerpicked is unique to that class of instruments and has yet to be consistently recreated in the virtual realm.

Okay, I know what you’re thinking: “For an article about guitar VSTs, there’s a lot of anti-guitar VST emotion.” ‘Are you going to spend the entire time whining?’

You would know the answer is no if you simply LET ME FINISH. While I understand the challenges of reproducing the intricacies of guitar playing, it’s not like other instruments with better VST emulations don’t have similar playstyle nuances. That, combined with the fact that the overall quality of guitar VSTs has been continuously improving, meaning there is actually a lot to commend and talk about in a favourable perspective.

If you try to compose a complete song with sample libraries instead of real guitars, you can run into some audio difficulties, especially when strumming chords or controlling dynamics on an emotive solo.

There’s no reason why a VSTi for any sort of guitar (electric, acoustic, or bass) can’t be a helpful tool in your — I tried to think of another word but failed — toolbox if you chose to work hard to make the MIDI notation and articulation sophisticated with a specific purpose in mind.

WHAT IS THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN GUITAR AND AMP VSTS?
While this appears to be a simple solution (one is a guitar, the other is an amp! ), a quick Google search reveals that this is not the case.

After sifting through the results of a Google search for “best guitar vsts,” it’s easy to forget you’re no longer in Kansas and end up with a bunch of pricey software.

Because the intricacies of guitars are historically difficult to master for digital playing, most producers avoid virtual guitars and offset a lack of equipment/space with a virtual amp, as I indicated before (you may have missed it; I only spent the entire introduction talking about it).

Guitar vs. Amplifier


The distinction between an amp simulator and a virtual guitar is in the sort of VST they are — guitar or amp simulator. VSTs are virtual instruments that generate sound using MIDI data from your DAW’s software that may be drawn manually or played with a suitable MIDI keyboard.

Amp VSTfxs, on the other hand, are used to change the sound and can only be added to a MIDI track’s plugin effects chain after a virtual instrument has been added (however on audio tracks, virtual amps can be placed anywhere on the signal chain to affect recordings from guitars, keyboards and even vocals).

Amp modelling is incredibly popular, well-known for its diversity (imagine any amp and pedal in existence at the click of a mouse), and routinely produces excellent audio results.

Because of their importance and prevalence, we’ve dedicated a whole article to them HERE.

Prepare to dig through a haystack of amp simulators and pedal libraries if you’re looking for that one good virtual guitar that’ll shake up your audio recordings.

SOME AMP SIMULATION IDEAS FOR USING NOT-SO-REALISTIC GUITAR VSTs
Amplification for guitars
The subject of the last paragraph is a wonderful segue into one of the finest ways to get the most out of your virtual guitar: pairing it with an amp.

Even if you’re merely utilising an acoustic guitar, adding a certain form of amplification, such as a Send/Return, can help bring its audio attributes closer to reality.

While precisely modelled VSTis provide some versatility in terms of changing tonal characteristics, they are ultimately limited by the amp used to capture the samples.

Combining a guitar and an amplifier (who’d have guessed it’s a match made in heaven!) allows for more flexibility in terms of the tone of the guitar you want to use in your recordings — it goes without saying that near endless amp simulators = near endless guitar sounds.

Blending the original amp sound (or lack thereof, in the case of most acoustic VSTis) with another is a possible technique to make most guitar software more viable in your songs.

ORCHESTRAL MUSIC SYMPHONY ORCHESTRAL ORCHESTRAL ORCHESTRAL OR
Orchestral guitars are, unsurprisingly, the best guitar VSTs for cinematic/symphonic composition. These are usually acoustic and come as part of a bigger library or bundle that includes strings, horns, woodwinds, and other instruments.

The fact that there are usually a number of different textures and harmonies thickening the sonic sphere of the song means that the guitar won’t be in the foreground of the mix and can play more of a complimentary role is part of the greater application value of orchestral guitars.

Because this programme is frequently included as part of a larger collection of virtual instruments, the guitar tone will blend in nicely with the rest of the piece.

This implies that, while the guitar VST may sound unnatural and lifeless when used alone, it will be a match made in heaven when combined with a complete ‘orchestra’ (don’t worry, I won’t tell anyone you didn’t play and record all 40 instruments in your song).

Music Texture as a TEXTURE/ATMOSPHERE


Though acoustic guitars can add a unique layer of instrumentation to your piece, this is primarily for electric guitar VSTs.

This programme may be a soldier for a variety of composition genres when combined with a decent reverb, saturation, or some analog-modeled EQ effects.

Full-bar chords in the background of a pop, rock, or indie song provide your music a distinct tone that’s different from what you’d get with a pad.

DELAYS! TAPES! HEAVY EFFECTS!) Yes!) single, long-held notes can give a breath of fresh air to your ambient, metal, or post-rock compositions, adding a fresh aspect to the song’s atmosphere that would otherwise be missed if you didn’t have a guitar (or the means to play it).

FOR SPECIFIC APPLICATIONS, SPECIFIC VSTis
Types of Guitars
There are many different sorts of instrument models to pick from in the realm of guitar software.

When it comes to sound design and the samples each product employs, it stands to reason that virtual instruments intended for a specific purpose will perform better than a “all-rounder.”

For example, an acoustic ‘strummer’ guitar would not be appropriate for a classical, fingerpicking folk composition, but it would be ideal as a background instrument in an alt rock song.

A leisurely, jazzy sunburst is unlikely to help a death metal tune, but it might help a dream pop band. It should also go without saying. To get the most accurate sound, use a bass VSTi.

Bass is a type of bass.

PROCESS AND ARTICULATE

You’re not giving yourself or the software a fighting chance if you buy a relatively expensive guitar VSTi, open it up, crank up the volume, play something ridiculous like Fur Elise on a midi keyboard, spout some onomatopoeia like “blergh” or “eugh” in disgust, close it, and complain about how bad the programme sounded.

I’ve harped on about how difficult it is to truly replicate the intrinsic ways a session, professional, or even amateur guitarist would play the guitar, so it stands to reason that if you don’t try to address this while experimenting with a plugin, it’ll sound as realistic as a parrot doing voiceovers for the next blockbuster movie — nothing more than a cheap imitation of Trail’s smooth, deep voice.

When you put in the time to master the keyswitches, different articulations, rhythms, and programming settings on any particular sample library, you’ll notice that many of the more advanced virtual guitars start to resemble something that’s not too unlike from the real thing.

Those inconsequential melodic qualities that go overlooked until they’re gone are essential for accurately replicating a guitar sound.

The unintentional ring and bleed of a note into the next, the faint scraping sound when you alter chord fingering, the slide from fret-to-fret — these are the sort of critical things you’re missing out on by not devoting yourself to studying the complexities of numerous guitar-modeled VSTis.

ANOTHER VST Plugin for Virtual Guitar


In the end, you’ll have a hard time finding software that both emulates the expression and playing style of a real guitar and records an actual musician.

While this is a principle that applies to almost every instrument in existence, it’s usual for producers to claim that VST guitars fall short in this department. To some extent, this is correct, however certain new sampling software and plugins are getting closer to the sweet spot.

My advice is to come up with a unique way to use them. Add more virtual amps and saturators to them, and utilise them in scenarios that will complement their distinct sound rather than exacerbate the brittleness and artificiality.

If you had an indie/alternative song with a genuine drumkit, bass, vocals, and acoustic guitars, adding a fake electric guitar to the mix at random would be blatantly obvious.

However, a lo-fi tune with a bitcru could be interesting.

Audio Effects Guide: Essentials to Have in Your Toolbox

Oh, yes, the dreaded “t” word. For many musicians, this is the misery of their existence. We just want to get into the studio and start working on our next masterpiece without having to think about things like frequency bands, key changes, or bit-rate.
But, unless we want to pay other people to do our work for us — which isn’t necessarily a bad approach — we’ll have to cross these bridges. It would be satisfying to burn them, but it would be detrimental to your quest to become the next insert influential songwriter here.
While your DAW and instruments will always be the backbone of your music studio, audio effects — whether native to your workstation’s software or third-party plugins — can be a Swiss army knife of otherwise unobtainable sounds and audio manipulation if utilised wisely.

You may provide yourself a better starting pad for your home studio’s creations by knowing about some of the most common audio effects, their intended objectives, and prospective uses.

Whether you want to learn how to mix your own music, explore the vast world of VSTs to expand your studio’s toolkit, or simply understand the theory behind it — no way! — It is my honest hope that this post will assist you in reaching your objectives.

Waves of Sound

I’m not a professional engineer, and I’m not claiming that this article will transform you from a complete newbie to a master of production, but it should provide an accessible overview of the most widely used audio effects.

With this information, you may begin to apply it to your own creative works, gradually becoming a competent audio engineer who is comfortable employing most of the generic audio effects on their songs via practise and application.

Books on Music

Of course, there are literally hundreds of books on the subject that will jumpstart your music studio’s campaign, hitting the ‘issue’ (that is, how to make a song sound good) from a variety of perspectives.

Individual audio effects have been the subject of entire books, so if you want further resources beyond what I present, please do so.

I’m not going to be envious.

THE FIVE MOST IMPORTANT

The 5 Most Important Audio Effects

In general, there are five basic audio effects that may be heard in practically any song that is recorded or played. Even if you’re not mixing, it’s likely that at least one of The Big 5 will become involved in some manner while you’re just fiddling around with some guitar pedals or even your hi-fi system.

Because of their prevalence, it is critical that we have a fundamental understanding of their functions before beginning any home studio project, even if we want to remain with vanilla VST/audio effects in the future.

The big five are as follows:

Equilibrium

Compression is the compression of anything.

Reverberation

Postponement

Saturation is the state of being completely saturated.

Today’s lesson will be focused on these topics, so sit up, pay attention, and prepare to take notes. If you’re lucky — and well-behaved — I might suggest a few additional exciting audio effects to impress your projects after class.

Are you all set?

Let’s get started.

EQS (Environmental Quality Standards) (EQUALIZERS)

WHAT ARE THEY, EXACTLY?

Equalizers (also known as EQs) are one of the most frequent types of audio processing, and are likely the only one of the five that customers have used without ever writing a song.

On your phone, typically with many presets, on your hi-fi system, on Spotify, on a guitar pedal, and even in your automobile, you can find EQs.

EQs can also be found in amplifiers and speakers, as well as in radio and television production rooms and theaters.Sound Sliders

Graphic and parametric EQ are the two most used types of EQ. There are a few others, but they all perform the same thing at a fundamental functional level: adjust the amplitude (electrical signal) of a specific “frequency band,” hence adjusting the overall sound.

This can be used to make things sound better, such as ramping up the bass in your automobile when a certain song comes on, or to remove unpleasant frequencies (sounds) like electrical hums and squeals.

Most EQs you’ll come across in your basic mixing and music-making adventures will also include a Q value, which determines the width of the frequency range that’s being tweaked.

Let’s imagine you want to reduce the bass volume of a music you’re working on. A low Q value suggests a wide band, which means your bass balancing cuts could range from 100 to 400 Hz.

On the other hand, if you use a much higher Q value, the loudness change may only apply to a range of 250-270hz.

A ‘filter’ is a term used to describe a method of modifying an audio signal. There are many distinct types of filters. Many of these will become second nature as your career as the next great musician progresses, but for now, I’ll keep it easy and provide a brief overview of the most prevalent and accessible filtering methods.

Shelving FiltersBell FiltersNotch FiltersHigh and Low-Pass FiltersShelving FiltersBell FiltersNotch Filters

High and low-pass filters (HPF and LPF, respectively) completely exclude all sound below or above a given frequency.

For example, if you set a high-pass filter to 200hz – the particular frequency range depends on the Q you employ – all sound below 100hz would be removed. A low-pass filter, on the other hand, does the exact opposite.

High Pass Filter in EQ

Filter with a high-pass value

These filters are necessary for almost all audio work, and they allow even the most inexperienced audio engineers to make a noticeable impact when cleaning up their recordings.

High-pass filters are also known as low-cut filters, and low-pass filters are also known as high-cut filters.

Parametric EQs have a few other capabilities, most of which I won’t go into since I don’t want to get dragged into the never-ending vacuum (keep an eye out for more vacuum metaphors throughout this series!) of audio engineering complexities.

Okay, that’s it. That’s all I’ve got to say about it. Let’s move on to the next section, where I’ll give you a taste of what you can accomplish with the overwhelming power that a simple little graph-looking-thingy on your screen can provide.

WHAT SHOULD I DO WITH IT AND WHEN SHOULD I USE IT?

Learning and applying EQ is better done visually (via image) and musically (through song) than the written word, as I ironically strive to tell my dedicated readers through scripture.

While the visuals supplied should provide some context, I wouldn’t be surprised if the previous section left a few novices to EQ perplexed.

Don’t worry; there’s a lot more to EQ than just understanding what it does. In fact, being taught exactly what to do with any combo is a harmful mindset in and of itself. The greatest way to do something is to do it for yourself (this will not surprise you, and may even irritate you…).

Engineer in charge of audio mixing

‘Well, someone on YouTube stated that if you EQ voices with a shelf filter at 5khz and a small boost at 450hz, then BAM!’ Your music will be ready for the air. However, when I used it to my brand new song, it made it sound much worse! ’

This is due to the fact that there is no single set of standards or criteria for successfully EQing a track. It should be done based on intuition and experience, and the only way to gain experience is to have the experience you need. Are You Experienced, as Jimi Hendrix put it?

Experiment with it! Choose a song at random. Various eq points can be dragged and dropped. Examine how each small modification you make affects the audio, potentially changing it in ways that are either invisible or game-changing.

With that said, equalisation is frequently utilised to improve the mix of a song in a variety of ways. I’ll go through a few of these techniques briefly before moving on to the second of five audio effects.

SWIMMING

Sweeping is a technique for detecting offensive sounds such as room resonances or malevolent echoes. It involves taking a bell filter, boosting it by an absurd amount (often 15dB or more), and then sweeping (I know, right?!!) through the entire frequency spectrum, noting particularly offensive sounds.

Although how you define particularly offensive is a subject of disagreement for this strategy and one of its key limitations, it can be beneficial for EQ newcomers on a basic level.

After that, add a notch filter to each of the frequency ranges you noted down.

EQUALIZING THE MIRROR

This approach of equalisation, also known as notching, is focused on ‘big’ musical productions with a number of separate tracks and layers that have some sound overlap.

Mirror EQing is a popular way to provide space to a muddy track or a tune where instruments simply disappear into the noise.

This is accomplished by raising a specific frequency signal in one recording and then cutting that same frequency band in another, allowing the sounds to cohabit happily in the auditory spectrum.

FILTERING BY PASS

Pass filtering, as previously said, is a crucial component of any mixing exercise and is one of the few clear-cut bits of guidance. This is something you should do with everything.

Basically, cut below the point where any actual sound enters the recording, then use the filter to remove hums and buzzes.

Of course, experience comes into play when selecting where to trim, and the best way to do this is to listen to the song/audio rather than what some random man on reddit suggested.

OTHER APPLICATIONS

When it comes to using EQ in your home studio, the list above is just the beginning.

It can be used creatively to mimic the sound of a loudspeaker or radio, or to change the position of various recordings within a sonic field. You can make vocals sound tiny and bright, or you can make pianos sound large and boomy.

What you do with EQ is up to you.

Best VST Plugins: Must-Have Effects for Any Budget (2021)

The VST (Virtual Studio Technology) world can be a scary place.
It’s similar to how a vacuum cleaner works. There’s a lot of loud noise and bells and whistles, but if you get too caught up in it, you’ll get dragged in and never come out.
Okay, so you may think that was the worst comparison I’ve ever made, but it’s technically correct. Spending a few hundred dollars on VSTs in the hopes of having your songs sound like they were recorded at Abbey Road studios is an intriguing concept.

Notes on Music

This is, to be clear, what makes virtual software so hazardous. You may spend an unlimited amount of money and yet see no progress in the quality of your music.

You’re simply throwing your money down the drain if you don’t know how to mix, record, or create songs, even on a basic level (see, I told you it makes sense).

But, hey, that’s why I’m here, right?

I don’t claim to be a professional music engineer. I’ve never studied it in school.

If I showed up to a professional studio, I’m sure the large, burly security officers would be sent to remove me from the premises for attempting to create the world’s next huge pop song.

But I’ve worked on enough of my own and others’ songs, seen enough YouTube videos, and read enough books to feel confident in my ability to become passionate about my next piece of software.

Note: We’ll be focusing on the greatest VST effects in this post (VSTfx). Check out our in-depth Virtual Instruments Guide if you want to learn more about virtual instruments (VSTi).

While a few online articles won’t turn you into Rick Rubin, by the conclusion of this writing series, you should have enough of a foundation to get your ‘VST licence,’ the musical equivalent of a pen licence.

I understand your point of view. ‘Yes, Ben, you’ve informed us.’ We must trial before we purchase. Before making a purchase, we must consider the pros and cons. Stop lecturing us and just go to work! ’

Okay, that’s OK. Let’s get this party started.

WHAT EXACTLY IS A VISUAL STUDIO TEMPLATE (VST)?

DAW (Digital Audio Workstation) Recording

A virtual ‘plugin’ is a programme that generates or manipulates audio in some way. These are often found in digital audio workstations (DAWs) such as FL Studio, GarageBand, Pro Tools, and others, but they may also be found in video editing software such as Sony Vegas.

They’re usually.VST files that may be found online in the form of packages. They are typically rather simple to instal once downloaded, needing nothing more than dragging and dropping into a previously chosen location. Isn’t it simple?

Although the terms ‘effect’ and ‘plugin’ are sometimes used interchangeably, a VST differs from stock effects in that it is produced by a third party rather than the DAW creator.

However, for all intents and purposes, they are the same thing.

VST plugins are divided into three categories:

Outcomes (the focus of this article). Rather than being the source of the audio, these modify, alter, and manipulate pre-existing sounds. Unlike VSTi, which is almost always a MIDI track, VSTfx can be used on any type of track in a DAW.

Everything from the aforementioned “five vital effects” through spectrums, frequency analyzers, tape emulators, and so on is included.

THE INTERESTING STUFF

Guitar with a Crocodile on it

It can be exciting to look for VSTs. The possibilities are unlimited, whether it’s sifting through sale after sale, following your favourite company through every new release, or discovering an obscure $20 piece of software that turns all of your piano records into harmonies of a cat meowing.

In this article, I’ll do my best to keep it neat by examining the five most common types of VST effects used in music design, creation, and mixing.

That said, I’ve set aside room in an article (one of the VSTi ones) to talk about some of the more bizarre VSTs. Sorry for the inconvenience. I couldn’t help myself.

THESE ARE THE 5 INTERNATIONAL VST EFFECTS FOR ANY HOME STUDIO.

If you’ve read the first piece in this series — and I’ll make it clear that you won’t be able to pass my so-called “course” unless you’ve done so! — You probably already know this, but here’s a quick rundown of the most common VSTfx you’ll find in your DAW’s mixing tools.

Audio Effects Mixing

Equilibrium

Compression is the compression of anything.

Reverberation

Postponement

Saturation is the state of being completely saturated.

These five effects may be found in almost every song ever released, from lo-fi black metal to 80s synthpop (and often many more).

They’re vital for creating a sound, whether you’re using them to ‘clean up a mix’ or to develop and create a unique sonic brand for your music.

However, don’t make your brand synonymous with “throw a bucket of reverb on everything!” We’ve had our fill of them. Tame Impala, I’m talking to you.

ADDITIONAL BITES AND PIECES

You’re almost done with my class now that we’ve learned about the various sorts of VST plugins and their uses. HOLD IT, I almost said. We haven’t finished yet.

What is the best way to combine VSTs?

Okay, but how do I go about installing VSTs?

Software vs. Hardware

Presets are a great way to get started.

ALWAYS MOVING IN THE SAME DIRECTION

Hurrah! The theoretical portion of the composition has been completed. Hopefully you’ve learnt a lot – I tried to keep it short (HA!) but comprehensive, which I’m now realising is an oxymoron for a reason. Anyway…

You’re getting closer to getting your VST licence — the piece of paper you can print off, frame, and hang over your home studio as a reminder that Ben from PianoDreamers, who never studied mixing, VSTs, or became a professional producer, let you download and use VSTs.

License for VST

Isn’t this exciting? I think it would be remiss of me not to inform you where you can find VSTs now that you know what they are.

Although the list below is far from comprehensive, many of these concepts will have been used in productions ranging from Derek’s SoundCloud rap with 10 listens to, well, I don’t know. Name a song that was released before to 2010.

That’s the one.

VST PLUGINS WITH THE BEST EFFECTS

Before we get started, keep in mind that most VSTs come in a ‘pack,’ which frequently provides significantly more value than purchasing each plugin alone. While the focus of this part will be on VSTs in isolation, I will make sure to highlight the whole package from which they come if necessary.

Also, keep in mind. Your studio’s centrepiece is your music, flair, and imagination, and no number of VSTfx can replace passion.

AVAILABLE STOCK

VST Plugins from the Store

Almost every DAW comes with a set of ‘stock plugins,’ which are VSTs that are native (included) to the application. Some come with more features than others; see my article on DAWs for a more detailed look at what the most popular applications include.

I’m not going to argue about which stock plugins are better than others – it’s a pointless exercise, and to be honest, I haven’t tested every DAW from a mixing standpoint, so it would be dishonest of me to remark on that.

However, I believe that a very essential point to make, if not a glamorous one, is that stock plugins are typically very, very solid operators.

Stock EQs, compressors, reverbs, delays, and saturators may undoubtedly be used to create a passable mix.

It could be a better idea to put off the intriguing, but ultimately distracting, various alternatives available on alternative plugins for later and become well-acquainted with your DAW’s vanilla plugins, especially when you begin to dip your toes in the wide, terrifying world of VSTs.

They’re typically “no-frills” audio components that have all the necessities you need to make a great-sounding beat without drowning you in the ludicrous (and tantalising) details that fancier and more expensive plugins brazenly flaunt.

My weapon of choice (Ableton) has a variety of easy-to-use EQs and compressors that I like to use over some of the more complex, hardware-modeled choices I have.

Audio Effects in Hardware

I realise that in most cases, the more expensive alternative is preferable, but each situation is unique. Because of my comfort level and the enticing simplicity of a handful of Ableton’s built-in plugins, they get significantly more use than some of the more frillier alternatives in my VST library.

What is the main point I’m attempting to make?

Stock VSTs aren’t to be overlooked. Spend that money on anything else if a free plugin accomplishes the same functions as a $100 plugin.

Meow Synth is a good example.

GET IT FOR FREE

There are numerous free plugins available. Trawling sites like KVR and Plugin Boutique, picking out random enticing software like apples from a tree, can quickly fill your VST reservoir.

This is a lot of fun, but it might end up filling up your DAW’s library with useless apps and effects that sound (get it? because they’re audio effects?) fantastic in principle but are available for free for a reason.

For the sake of brevity, I’ll only go over 5 free VSTs in depth, one for each of the essential mixing elements I discussed in prior posts. Having said that, I’ll suggest a few other options that are well worth your attention.

What about a broad overview of free VSTs in general, encompassing instruments, synths, and other strange effects? That is the subject of a separate article. I know it’s exciting, but it’s probably best if you quit drooling over the thought.

This list will not cover one-time cheap VSTs, but keep a watch out for them because developers will periodically release their work for free in the wild.

MELDA’S MEQUALIZER (EQ)

MEqualizer EQ Melda Melda Melda Melda Melda Melda

THE OFFICIAL WEBSITE

Melda is one of the more well-known VST developers, offering a near-infinite number of free plugins, the majority of which are of exceptionally good quality. The MEqualizer isn’t any different.

How to Write a Song: A Full Guide to Arranging Music (2021)

It’s no surprise that we’re big fans of digital music as a website dedicated to reviewing the best digital pianos on the market. Computers are used in almost every aspect of our lives these days, and music is no exception.
MIDI is a technology that is almost definitely familiar to you, as it is included with practically every modern keyboard and digital piano. While it may appear ancient, it is one of a keyboardist’s most effective weapons.
This is the second instalment in our series on the principles of software-based music production. We previously addressed the unsightly task of connecting our keyboards and PCs. Then we taught you how to use software pianos to have more flexible recording options.

The previous post was either trivially easy or a valuable guide to the digital arena of music making, depending on your level of tech savvy. In any case, we hope it was a useful introduction to or review of the field of music software.

THIS TIME, WE’RE GOING TO:

I made a bold claim at the end of the previous piece. I claimed that all I needed to compose a radio-ready tune was a mixture of software instruments and a Digital Audio Workstation (DAW). This time, I’m hoping to prove it, or at the very least, progress in that direction.

The piano has a beautiful tone, and we all appreciate a good piano-solo piece now and then. However, if we only use a DAW to record pianos, we are underutilizing its advantages.

We’ll show you how to build music arrangements today. That means we’ll be including some new instruments into our songs.

I have an idea for a song that could include drums, bass, and acoustic guitar. We could rent a studio and collect a few acquaintances with the necessary experience (assuming the global pandemic is gone).

Let us, however, impose some limitations. Is it possible to create this idealised setup with the bare-bones configuration we established in the previous guide (which lacks even a microphone)?

The answer is yes, which is probably not unexpected (since this article would not exist if it weren’t).

OUR SYSTEM

To refresh your memory, here are the tools you have at your disposal following the previous session:

A MIDI keyboard/digital piano is our primary means of converting our live performances into data. The Nektar SE49 is what I’m using.

A capable computer — Because we’re doing things in software, we’ll need some processing power from our computer, but any system created or released in the last 7 years or so should suffice. I’m working on my Windows 10 production laptop, which is in the mid-range.

The major brains behind the process is a Digital Audio Workstation (DAW). This will serve as the central centre for recording, editing, and synchronisation. I’m using Ableton Live 10 Suite again this time, but you may use any DAW you have. However, Ableton Live 10 has the longest trial time of any modern DAW, so give it a chance if you’re unsure. If you’re interested in learning more about alternative DAWs, Ben offers a great overview of the benefits and drawbacks of modern DAWs.

VST Software Pianos – A simple approach to get studio-quality piano sounds without having to deal with complicated mic setups or audio hookups. I’ll be using AiR’s Mini Grand, a simple piano plugin that I’ve just fallen in love with, but you can use any piano sound you choose.

We’ll use the same configuration as last time, with any new tools being free software plugins that you can get right now. I recommend downloading and installing all of these plugins before restarting your DAW, as DAWs do checks every time plugins are detected, which can take a long time.

percussion instruments

Bassoon

the guitar

a set of strings

Synthesizer is a type of electronic instrument.

These plugins were chosen based on a simple set of criteria. They had to be unrestricted, and they had to sound fantastic. In general, you shouldn’t expect much from free software, but these plugins are indisputably the best, and I’ve used them all in some capacity for commercial projects or demos.

Simply download and instal these plugins’ VST formats into the VST folder created in the previous guide. If you’re using Logic Pro as your DAW, keep in mind that VSTs aren’t supported, therefore utilise the AAX format instead.

Why don’t you suggest (insert plugin here)?

PREPARATIONS IN ADVANCE

If you’re using Ableton, keep in mind that I’ll be working in the horizontal Arrangement view rather than the vertical Session view that the programme uses by default. You can do so by pressing the ‘Tab’ key on your keyboard. Other DAW users will be able to follow along more easily as a result of this.

Let’s set up our production environment now that we’ve chosen our instruments. This step may appear monotonous and unappealing, but dealing with the scum ahead of time will surely save time in the long run.

We’ll also use this time to troubleshoot frequent problems.

We’ll use a Digital Audio Workstation to do the heavy lifting, as we did last time. We’re using Ableton Live, but any current DAW will suffice.

Regardless of the application, the same concepts apply, and you’ll be able to apply the abilities you learn here to any situation.

We used our DAW straight out of the box the last time, and it worked fine for simple piano recordings and MIDI editing. However, by making a few adjustments and performing some checks ahead of time, we can help the event go more smoothly.

First and foremost, we must select the appropriate audio driver and buffer size. Because Apple’s MacOS handles this well by default, you may ignore it for the time being.

If you’re a Windows user, I strongly advise you to utilise ASIO drivers, which eliminate many of the drawbacks that DirectX audio drivers have, such as latency.

Users of Windows

Setting the Buffer Size

Let’s move on to fine-tuning the user interface. You may be happy with your DAW’s default look and feel, but I believe that there is no such thing as a one-size-fits-all solution, and that altering basics like font size and colour scheme can improve the whole experience.

Configure the User Interface

Finally, let’s double-check that our VST plugins are installed appropriately. In theory, every DAW scans for new plugins as it starts up, so we should be OK.

Unfortunately, some plugins have unusual installation paths, or you may have been utilising a custom VST plugin folder. The simplest method to check this is to load your plugin into your DAW and see if it works.

If you’re experiencing trouble, I’ll go over a few typical pitfalls further down.

Plugin Issues That You Should Be Aware Of

We can now get into the meat of this article now that we’ve dealt with the most inconvenient element of the procedure. Let’s get some music going.

STEP ONE: COMPOSE A SONG

This phase is perhaps the most time-consuming of the entire procedure, but it is also the most crucial. Even if we’re only performing a quick tutorial on arrangement tools, having a good idea will be really beneficial.

You may have heard of the term “noodling,” which refers to the act of playing ideas at random with no rhyme or reason and never fully remembering or refining them.

This is something you should try to avoid at all costs. Even if you only have a hazy idea, it’s better than beginning from scratch. After all, even the tiniest hint of direction can propel you forward.

To get the most out of this guide, set aside an hour to brainstorm some ideas. Record yourself playing chords and melodies on your piano. It’s better than nothing if you only have an intro and a stanza.

Try to recall your current instrument set if at all feasible. Pianos, drums, bass, and guitars are among the instruments available. Try to work within those restrictions because that’s a complete band.

When you’re finished, we can start fleshing out the concept.

For the purposes of this tutorial, I’m going with a concept from my label’s work. I want to write a Taiwanese-Pop Rock song with an 80-beat-per-minute tempo and a catchy backbeat. I also want to keep things simple enough for the vocals and topline to shine.

It’s a rudimentary concept, but it’s enough to work with.

Knowing what I want also allows me to set the tempo and metronome to make recording go more smoothly. Note that I’m also utilising a one-bar count-in for ease of recording.

You’ll note that I’m utilising an 8/8 time signature. It’s just a matter of taste, but I prefer a faster metronome for keeping time. If you’re in the mood for a waltz, leave yours in 4/4 or even 3/4 time.

STEP 2: RECORDING THE ORIGINAL THOUGHT

We’ll start by recording the piano sections because we’re pianists. If you’re not sure where to begin, check out the previous instalment in this series, where we walk you through the basics of recording software pianos.

To summarise, we loaded our piano plugin, turned on the metronome, and set the piano track to record. After that, all we have to do is press the record button and play along with the beat. Remember that we’ll be adding drums and bass to this song, so keep it as rhythmic as possible.

I also designate the ‘R’ key on my PC keyboard to the record button for convenience. This allows me to record multiple takes without having to use my mouse, which saves time.

I personally took a few tries before finding one I liked, so don’t be scared to combine many takes.

For example, you can see that the intro and verse were recorded separately. You could think it’s unethical, but I believe it’s my job to write good music, not to obtain ideal one-shot takes.

Comping: In its most basic form, comping entails sewing together several different takes. This is most typically employed on vocal performances, with separate takes for each word syllable being employed in extreme cases. Other DAWs offer more detailed options, but Ableton Live’s comping functionality lags behind the competition.

It’s worth noting that we’ll almost certainly have to re-record.

Best Free Piano Lessons: Everything You Need to Get Started

I’ve investigated several of the greatest online piano classes available here on Piano Dreamers. While these online techniques are a fraction of the cost of traditional in-person classes, they still demand a financial commitment, which may deter budget-conscious first-time pianists.
That’s why I’ve compiled this collection of free piano resources to help beginners get started with the instrument without having to break the bank.
Free lessons have disadvantages when compared to paid alternatives, whether online or in person. Less organisation, a lack of teacher support, and fewer opportunities are among them.

The resources in this list were chosen because they manage to avoid some of these flaws, but we must remember that a $0 price tag demands some compromise on our part.

Regardless of whether you’re seeking for a primary learning technique or something to supplement the weaker aspects of your current piano course, these free piano resources are well worth investigating. Let’s get started!

CHANNELS ON YOUTUBE

YouTube is a great place to start for free piano lessons, but be careful not to fall into the trap of learning songs by emulating them rather than developing any real musical skills or knowledge.

Short video lessons from channels like the two below provide strong piano knowledge.

ACADEMY OF CREATIVE PIANO

Josef Sykora’s channel offers over 100 video lessons, starting with introductory topics and progressing to intermediate methods. The videos are categorised into playlists with titles such as “New Here?” Check out “Left Hand Piano – Videos to Improve Your Left Hand” and “Left Hand Piano – Videos to Improve Your Left Hand”.

The playlists provide some structure so that students know where to begin and what they should be practising.

Like many paid online methods, the video tutorials have a high production value, including overhead keyboard views, displaying staff, and highlighted keys. Josef teaches in a clear, pleasant manner, and the feedback has been extremely favourable.

Pedaling, rhythm exercises, adding emotion, finger exercises, and scales are only a few of the themes covered in the lessons. However, with the goal of playing popular music, the overall focus is on chords and improvisation.

Josef demonstrates chording, melodic pattern creation, harmonising, and other techniques. All of the song samples are piano-only, unlike other chord-focused classes I’ve encountered where it’s believed that you’ll want to accompany yourself while singing the melody.

Josef has prepared free guide sheets to go along with some of the video courses, such as a rhythm exercise sheet and a beginner finger exercise sheet, in addition to the video sessions. Paid courses with more structured lessons and “practise pathways” are also available from Creative Piano Academy.

Adults and teenagers who enjoy playing popular music appear to be the target demographic for this channel.

What’s done correctly: A wide range of engaging lessons, clear instructions, and examples that are enjoyable to listen to and perform are available. The lessons are set up in such a way that pupils can begin playing straight away.

What’s missing: While notes are always visible on the staff during sessions, Creative Piano Academy does not emphasise reading music or theory. There is also no obvious lesson or level advancement, despite the fact that playlists provide some structure.

WEB-BASED PIANO LESSONS

Piano Lessons on the Web is a YouTube channel dedicated to teaching beginner pianists helpful tactics and exercises, as well as compositions and music theory.

Tim teaches the classes, and he does a fantastic job at teaching subjects in a straightforward manner.

There are hundreds of videos on this channel covering everything from posture, rhythms, and finger dexterity to troubleshooting, pop chords, and ear training.

To help students proceed logically, the first beginner lectures are organised into playlists, and Tim takes it a step further by splitting the playlists into three levels. The lessons, however, have not been put into any type of order other than the order in which they were posted following this stage.

In contrast to Creative Piano Academy, the classes emphasise reading music, theory, and technique. They don’t have you playing in the first few videos, but they do make sure you have a strong theoretical basis and can study pieces from sheet music.

This may explain why there are fewer lessons on Piano Lessons on the Web that teach a single song – it’s assumed that you’ll be performing pieces from external sheet music.

This channel is a wonderful place to start if you enjoy classical music or want to learn how to read music. Adults and teenagers are the best candidates.

What’s done well: The theory, reading music, and technical courses are thorough and comprehensive.

What’s missing: There aren’t many chord or improvisation lessons, so you’ll have to hunt for additional sheet music.

Virtual Instruments: In-Depth Guide + Best Free VSTi (2021)

Welcome back to the most exciting edition of my VSTi (virtual studio technology instruments) series yet: the one in which I show you how to build a library of sounds and instruments that would make even the most populated orchestras green with envy.
VSTis differ from VSTfx in that they don’t change sounds; instead, they create them.
These instruments frequently act as the primary plugin on a DAW (Digital Audio Workstation) software track, or as a standalone programme on your computer, and use MIDI input data to detect and replicate melodies and musical tones.

VSTs come in many shapes and sizes, featuring practically every instrument, retro synth, soundscape, and whatever else some devious engineer has concocted.

Because it’s so simple to recreate popular and obscure instruments, a growing number of composers are opting for digital orchestras and mimicked samples rather than paying real musicians.

While technology has advanced and musicality (articulations, nuanced dynamics, and expressions) is better portrayed in VSTis, they are still not a perfect substitute for the real thing.

When possible, it’s still a good idea to employ virtual instruments as a supplement rather than the focal point of a recording. Even with the most stringent automation and AI learning, real instruments played by human artists will nearly always produce an unmistakable sound.

Studio for recording music

That said, I am well aware that most of our studios (including mine) have a significant amount of space taken up by unnecessary artefacts such as beds, work-desks, and wardrobes, and as a result, we lack the space (not to mention the funds) to host the entire London Symphony Orchestra to record a couple of harmonies for our next song, ‘Untitled and Unfinished Track #28.’

Another advantage of sampled instruments is that not everyone has the time to learn to play the kalimba or whatever other odd sound they like.

With instrument plugins, the possibilities are unlimited. It’s a really thrilling time to be alive. I feel honoured to be alive to witness the capacity to play with limitless sounds, and for concepts that would otherwise never see the light of day to be just a click of a ‘download here’ button away.

Of course, this has had the unintended consequence of allowing one too many DJ ‘insert virtually any phrase in the dictionary here’s to emerge, but I believe the benefits outweigh the drawbacks.

So, I assume…

VSTis OF DIFFERENT TYPES

Instruments of Music

As I previously stated, there are an infinite amount of VST versions to explore and add to your burgeoning library. This was obviously a slight exaggeration. If it were true, this article would continue on and on indefinitely.

However, there are a staggering amount of virtual instrument options, and listing them all would be a pretty odd way to spend my time.

If you’re really desperate, just google “list of every sound ever” and scroll through the results.

I’ll skip the unnecessary sarcastic statements and instead focus on the most fundamental branches of virtual instruments that are most popular among aspiring home musicians.

Any exceptions or omissions from my list should not come as a surprise – if you want a digital leaf rustling sampler, it most likely exists, but I think I can be forgiven for not include it among the more popular musician’s tools.

I’ll try to stay away from specific VSTi companies and products that I enjoy in this section because they’ll be covered in more depth later in the article and in future editions of the PianoDreamers’ VST series.

SYNTHESIS

Synthesizer Wolf

VSTis are most commonly used with synthesisers. There will always be a place for a virtual synth in your plugin collection, whether it’s hardware-modeled pieces like Arturia’s Jupiter-8 V (based on Roland’s synth of the same name), digital wave-table synths like NI’s Massive, or massive sound libraries like Spectrasonic’s Omnisphere.

The digital potential of synthesisers requires no explanation; given their electronic nature, they are logical candidates for conversion to virtual software. Many synth VSTs are entirely modelled and don’t use samples, reproducing a distinctive analogue tone through synthesis, just like their hardware counterparts.

With the exception of Izotope’s Iris 2, which is a whole new ballgame and more of a mini-DAW packaged as a VST than a basic virtual instrument, there are sample-based synths (Stagecraft’s Infinity, for example), but I’ve found them to be less pliable than synthesis-based synthesisers.

Before we go into sample-based VSTs, it’s worth noting that many gorgeous virtual instruments fall within the category of Kontakt (or another similar host like Vienna Ensemble) instruments and won’t work as standalone plugins in your DAW software. To run and change these sounds, you’ll need the base host.

So, if a digital instrument specifies that “the latest version of Kontakt is required to run this programme,” you better believe it.

It’s worth noting that Kontact comes in two flavours: a complete (paid) version and a free version called Kontact Player. Some libraries require the full version of Kontakt to run, while others can run on either, so read the description/requirements of your VST carefully.

The complexities of Kontakt are much above my grasp and what I can accurately explain in this essay without confusing everyone, so I’ll stop there. However, it’s well worth your time to consider Kontakt as THE cornerstone of your sample-based virtual instrument collection.

Guy Michelmore has created a fantastic video that goes into great detail over the entire Kontakt ecosystem and should answer most of your questions about how Kontakt works.

If you have the resources, you may also create your own virtual instruments by encrypting sounds to create a Kontakt library, using iZotope’s Iris, or just dragging and dropping audio files into your DAW’s in-built sampler (like Ableton Live’s Sampler).

KEYS AND PIANO

Piano Playing Giraffe

Wouldn’t it be irresponsible of me not to mention piano on a website called Piano Dreamers? Fortunately, I am not known for being sloppy (in fact, those who have read my previous articles will know that I am the polar opposite), and the world of sampled key and piano VSTs is a lot of fun.

It’s crucial to note that while you can get synth-modeled keys and pianos from libraries like Omnisphere and Massive, or even make them yourself, sample-based libraries are your best bet if you want a realistic Wurlitzer or a striking Steinberg.

I’ve always found piano VSTs to be difficult to master — there are so many wonderfully designed virtual instruments out there, but I never have a go-to option that blows everything else out of the water.

Whenever I enter the studio, there is a different piano for a different purpose (a.k.a roll out of bed at 11 10 9 in the morning).

That isn’t to suggest that these synthetic replicas of famous pianos aren’t accurate — they are — it’s simply that the tone I employ in every given tune is odd and finicky.

EP models, on the other hand, are more all-encompassing for my needs. There’s no reason for this, and this piece of advise may be utterly useless to you, but I’d look for a larger piano library or try out a variety of pianos before making a purchase.

When it comes to EPs, the first one you listen to and fall in love with is likely to serve you well for a long time.

A COMPLETE GUIDE TO VSTS ON THE PIANO

THE STRINGS

Strings are being played by a deer.

Virtual instruments in the string sector range from enormous orchestras with twenty different samples to singular, painstakingly modelled and programmable string instruments that I’ve never heard of (what on earth is a Balalaika?).

You may get very realistic replications of instruments like lutes and fiddles for a mediaeval tone, or mix a basic orchestra VSTi with a dark synth pad for a cyberpunk atmosphere.

Strings’ potential for use in nearly every genre of popular music goes without saying — but this is on top of that.

Best Guitar Amp Simulators: The Ultimate Guide (2021)

If the name didn’t give it away, an amp simulator is precisely what it says on the tin: a programme that replicates an amplifier (or more often, amps). Amp simulations are immensely popular among guitarists, engineers – amateur and professional alike – and cover a wide variety of famous tones to amps that have no real purpose to exist.
If you’ve been following my VST effects series (if you haven’t, that’s ok; just know that I’m disappointed in your lack of dedication to me), there’s a simple way to distinguish between a virtual instrument and a virtual effect:
Sound is produced via a VSTi (Virtual Studio Technology instrument).

The sound is altered using a VSTfx (Virtual Studio Technology effect).

Guitar amp simulators come into the latter group since they don’t make the sound of a guitar; instead, they modify the output of another recording or track to make it appear like it was played through an amp.

Though many of these guitar simulator VSTs are extremely malleable and capable of unrecognizably mangling and transforming various sounds through a suite of options, stomp-boxes, and cabinets, they are essentially just amp simulators.

WHAT IS THE PURPOSE OF SIMULATION?

Look around right now if you’re an artist with a bedroom in your studio (not the other way around). I doubt you have more than 2-3 amps and certainly not enough space to comfortably fit and eventually record more than 5. Unless you’re rich, professional, or just a better planner than I am, I doubt you have more than 2-3 amps and certainly not enough space to comfortably fit and eventually record more than 5.

That’s it – the simplest argument for mimicking an amplifier. Most enthusiasts can’t afford to spend thousands of dollars on each classic amplifier to build an army of amplifiers to do their bidding, but many amp libraries do it for a fraction of the cost and space.

Amplifier Recording

Amps can take up a lot of space, especially if you’re using a cabinet and head instead of a combo amp (which combines the speaker and amplifier into one box).

Did you just shiver when you thought of mic stands and cables? — it can turn into a minefield for tangling, tripping, or simply becoming frustrated and breaking things on your own.

Simulated amps, on the other hand, do take up space; it’s just not physical space.

If you start buying amp libraries like crazy, your computer may slow down and become deceptively harmful to your music-making process — but if you have a powerful PC and plenty of hard drive space, this is unlikely to become a major problem.

Guitar Amps in a Variety of Styles

There’s also no need to worry about room acoustics, microphone placement (or even owning a microphone), or amp simulation — everything is taken care of, and is often easily adjustable, within the programme itself.

You don’t have to fiddle with your amp’s knobs or move your microphone stand 2 inches to the left to drastically change the tone that fits this one riff, only to have to remember where they were for the rhythm section beforehand.

A real amp can be a pain to record, and amp simulators graciously avoid these problems without asking for anything in return. Except for your money, of course.

Simulated amplifiers, on the other hand, offer more than just convenience. Many programme libraries have such a broad array of modelled sounds and pedals, mic placements, and amps that you may create effects and unique audio scapes that would be impossible to achieve with an actual amplifier.

Have you ever wondered what type of guitar tone you could obtain by utilising a Fender Reverb in reverse with an Orange Crush and a RAT pedal?

Yeah, neither did I, but you can (though not necessarily should) do it with an amp simulator. The options aren’t infinite, but they’re certainly limitless.

WHY USE THE ACTUAL PRODUCT?

Real Guitar Amp versus. Amp Simulator

So far, everything seems fantastic — almost too good to be true. What are the disadvantages?

Simulations of amplifiers are precisely that: simulations. The fidelity with which they replicate authentic guitar amplifiers is alarmingly impressive, but it’s still a long way from the real thing – modelling and replacing a real instrument, as with any other VST, is an almost difficult task.

However, this has no bearing on how you should proceed with your creative endeavours. It doesn’t mean something won’t sound excellent or complement your recordings just because it doesn’t sound exactly like the real thing.

Most professional guitarists will still prefer to track their first recordings with genuine amps, although this dynamic may not be as straightforward when it comes to mixing.

It is then possible to add a guitar amp VST either as an auxiliary track (so you can control the proportion of ‘dry’ and ‘wet’ signals) or as a direct in, allowing a complete tone change using pedals or even another amp without having to re-record anything, using the recording of the mic’d up amplifier.

This is also important for maintaining the ‘authentic’ sound of a guitar recorded over a mic’d amplifier.

Audio Cables Guide: 9 Most Used Connectors for Your Music Needs

The thing about wires that I despise the most isn’t the mess. It’s not the tangles, the continual setup and teardown, the winding down, or the storage. It’s not as if you’re tripping over them.
No, the thing I despise about wires is that they are an absolute requirement when it comes to establishing a music studio. These vexing, snake-like creatures sit smugly knowing that no matter how badly you want to throw them into a fire and never see them again, you can’t.
I see a scenario where Bluetooth — or a similar technology — is powerful enough to connect instruments, electronics, and computers without latency, dropouts, or a loss of audio clarity. But for the time being, I’ll have to hold my tongue and wait…

WHAT IS THE PURPOSE OF CABLES?

Illustration of Audio Cables

In all seriousness, despite their occasional (well, I mean frequent) inconvenience, I am appreciative for the services that cables give. Without them, recording music would be a much more difficult and low-fidelity procedure than it is now.

Audio interfaces have made it possible for even the most inexperienced person to become a professional bedroom producer and sound engineer; without them, we’d still be cutting up reels and sticking them back together.

This isn’t even taking into account the fact that electric guitars wouldn’t connect to amps, a lot of external hardware (pre-amps, delays, pedals, etc.) wouldn’t work, and computers wouldn’t exist.

WHAT ARE CABLES IN REAL LIFE? WHERE DO THEY COME FROM AND HOW DO THEY WORK?

ANALOG VS. DIGITAL

Audio Cables: Digital vs. Analog

Analog and digital cables are the two basic types of cables.

Analog cables transmit data from one location to another by a stream of electricity (an electrical signal).

Digital cables carry data from one location to another via a stream of binary code (1s and 0s).

Analog cables are usually the stars of the show in your music studio. Nonetheless, this article will discuss a few digital cables that are frequently required in the same way that a standard instrument cable is (MIDI, USB, Thunderbolt, Firewire, Optical, etc.).

However, there are two more factors to consider when categorising analogue cables: balanced vs. unbalanced, and the level at which the signal is conveyed.

INSTRUMENT LEVEL VS. MICROPHONE LEVEL

There are three levels of signal that are transmitted by a cable, as detailed in earlier articles:

Mic volume vs. line volume vs. instrument volume

The most common level utilised by professional audio equipment is line level.

When keyboards/synths/digital pianos are recorded in a signal chain, they are often output at line level.

Instrument level (also known as Hi-Z) refers to the direct level of guitars and basses communicated over an instrument wire before being transformed to line level by an audio interface or DI box.

Some audio interfaces provide a switch that enables you change the correct gain for each signal level (e.g. line, inst/Hi-Z) using the same input jack.

Mic level is the smallest of the three — the level generated by a microphone, which is then enhanced by a preamp to achieve line level.

EQUALLY BALANCED VS. UNEQUALLY BALANCED

Audio: Balanced vs. Unbalanced

Balanced cables are intended to be free of interference, such as that caused by radio transmissions, nearby signal broadcasts, and other external noise.

Unbalanced cables aren’t, which means they’re less suited to the quiet, clean signals needed for music listening on monitors, for example.

However, because most instruments (such as electric guitars and keyboards) have unbalanced outputs, using a balanced connection with them would be redundant – the end result would be the same.

By looking at what’s written next to the connector or consulting the owner’s handbook, you can typically determine if the outputs/inputs are balanced or unbalanced.

All three aspects of a balanced audio signal must be balanced: output, input, and cable.

When a balanced output is connected to an unbalanced input or via an unbalanced connection, the audio stream loses noise protection and becomes unbalanced.

However, if all you had were balanced cables, you wouldn’t be able to record or listen to music because they can still transport this signal perfectly well – the only difficulty would be the price difference between a balanced and unbalanced cable.

You can use a DI box (direct injection) to convert the unbalanced signal to one that is more suitable for recording/input into a preamp/mixer, etc. if you encounter an issue using a TS cable (which is unbalanced) with a guitar; be it clipping, extreme noise (as is common at long cable distances, generally over 15ft), etc.

ProDI Box Radial

1-channel Direct Box Radial ProDI

Essentially, you can turn a noisy instrument or line level signal into a balanced signal that can be plugged into the microphone input of your interface (XLR).

Because unbalanced cables are less shielded from signal transmissions than balanced cables, they struggle at longer cable lengths. The longer they are, the more likely they are to pick up distortion.

Balanced cables, on the other hand, aren’t always required for high-quality audio in a variety of applications. Connecting a pair of headphones to a phone’s headphone output, for example, will result in an unbalanced connection but not crackling or reduced audio fidelity.

Unless your headphone cable stretches all the way to Mercury…

Length of Guitar Cable

Furthermore, because the signal sent to headphones has already been increased, external interference will be minimal, as opposed to running a microphone level signal that is then amplified to line level (with all the distortions that the cable picked up along the way).

In general, balanced cables are mono, which means you’ll need two signals to create a stereo sound. However, there are a few exceptions, such as a five-pin XLR cable, which can transmit a stereo, balanced signal with just one connection.

I won’t go into any more detail about this wire because it’s quite improbable that you’d ever come across it on a hobbyist, bedroom level.

DIFFERENT TYPES OF CABLES

Types of Audio Cables

I’m not going to get into the nitty gritty of each cable. I’ll give you a general overview, as well as the various shapes and applications that each cable can serve, and that’ll be it.

This post would be around 40 thousand words long and more dull than insert your least favourite record here if I went into great detail on the functions, mechanics, and prospective uses of each unique wire on the music industry.

In addition, unless it is extremely relevant, I will refrain from mentioning and discussing every single converter/adapter accessible.

Most notable and functional cable heads can be converted to another (e.g. 1/4′′ TRS to 1/8′′ TRS or RCA to TRS, etc.). This includes utensils such as splitters and power packs.

CONNECTORS ANALOG

OVERVIEW OF THE TRS

Overview of TRS Cables

TRS (balanced) cables are available in a variety of diameters, ranging from 1/4” (6.35 mm) to 3/32”. (2.5 mm). Due to their scarcity in music studios, I will not cover the latter.

While 1/8″ jacks are commonly found in consumer-grade products such as smart phones and headphones, 1/4″ jacks are more commonly seen in studios, both are fundamentally the same type of wire – TRS.

While the only difference between these cables is their size, different sized jacks will often have distinct applications, which I will discuss further below.

CABLE TRS 1/4″

1/4 TRS Adapter

Balanced audio equipment (e.g., connecting a mixer’s Outs to a speaker’s Ins or wiring your audio interface’s mono Outs to the mono Ins of studio monitors), other studio applications where the connection must be longer than approx. Unbalanced stereo signals of 10–15 feet (if a 1/4′′ jack is required).

TRS cables are extremely identical to TS cables, with the exception of an extra ring on the jack. These balanced (mono-only) cables reduce noise while sending a signal between two sites.

TRS 1/4 Input

Their name comes from the fact that they are made up of a tip, ring, and sleeve. When working with balanced things like studio monitors, these are important in professional studios.

It’s worth noting that TRS jacks may transmit both unbalanced stereo signals (such as connecting headphones to a headphone amp/output) and balanced mono signals, regardless of cable length.

They won’t collapse if you use them with an unbalanced mono output (such as a guitar), but the signal will be unbalanced.

CABLE TRS 1/8″

TRS 1/8 Cable

Auxiliary inputs and extenders, headphone outputs, listening to mixes in the car, carrying unbalanced stereo signals are all common uses (e.g. your phone to your car).

This wire, also known as the ‘aux,’ is frequently utilised by obnoxious your loved pals in the car to play horrible great tracks from their phone. These wires, despite their status as a bit of a meme, are a really valuable tool for any home studio.

One of these cables (typically accompanied with a 1/8” to 1/4” jack adaptor) is used to connect many headphones, which is its most obvious purpose.

Unless you’re a madman (or… a creative genius? ), you’ll be using headphones to avoid bleed and background noise, which is their most obvious application.

a pair of headphones

Because many headphones use 1/8″ wires, a 1/8″ to 1/4″ adapter is required to connect them to most audio interfaces or headphone amplifiers.

Furthermore, if you have a larger space, a 1/8″ TRS female to male extender cable may be required so that your headphones can be utilised in all corners of the room.

The same principle applies to anything else that uses a ‘aux’ connection, such as certain speakers, and so on.